City Dwellers have Smaller Carbon Footprint Study Says

A Brookings Institute study released May 29, 2008, titled Shrinking the Carbon Footprint of Metropolitan America, found that U.S. city dwellers have lower carbon footprints than the average American. 

The study quantified transportation and residential carbon emissions for the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas.  Each resident of the largest 100 largest metropolitans areas is responsible on average for 2.47 tons of carbon dioxide in energy consumption each year, 14 percent below the 2.87 ton U.S. average.  Residential density, availability of public transit, carbon intensity of electricity generation, electricity prices, and weather were all important factors in understanding carbon footprints.  The study also found that carbon footprints varied widely between cities geographically- carbon emissions are highest in the eastern U.S. where coal is the common source for electricity, and lower in the West where weather is milder and electricity and motor fuel prices have been higher.

 

3 Responses to City Dwellers have Smaller Carbon Footprint Study Says

  1. What Happened? says:

    I’ve been watching this site for a long time now and it seems you’ve really lost your touch in the past month. What happened to the daily posts and multimedia? Please bring it back! We need this site.

  2. kleighmi says:

    We were going through a transition after the conclusion of Ecocity World Summit 2008 and the regular postings leading up to that…now onward into the future and looking towards the next conference and everything in between. So expect to see more from now on.

  3. Neola says:

    This blog is so informative. Good work!

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