Moving around suburbs costs more

November 4, 2009

An article in today’s San Francisco Chronicle titled S.F. transportation costs lower than in suburbs quotes a report being released by the Urban Land Institute with the all-encompassing title of “Bay Area Burden: Examining the costs and impacts of housing and transportation on Bay Area residents, their neighborhoods and the environment.”

Not that we didn’t know this already, but it says that “the average San Francisco household spends roughly $500 less on transportation each month than households in such suburban outposts as Antioch or Livermore.” All the talk about the inherent costs and problems associated with suburban life is great, but it’s the hard numbers that often drive the point home.

For families in more distant automobile-reliant suburbs, though, the monthly transportation costs spike. The estimate for Antioch is $1,311, for instance, while in Livermore it’s $1,281. Cities with little connection to transit also suffer – such as Pacifica, where a household’s monthly transportation is estimated to cost $1,246.

Read the whole article, it’s a good one to quote the next time someone tells you they live in the suburbs because it’s cheaper. Also check out the full report at bayareaburden.org. Also, check out the recent article Investment in public transit creates U.S. jobs for new green economy in The Hill.


Mathis Wackernagel Speaks

May 6, 2008

Mathis Wackernagle, Global Footprint Network, Oakland, CA

Mathis Wackernagel, Ph.D., is Executive Director of Global Footprint Network, the NGO highlighted in the eighth Ecocity World Summit 2008 Update. Mathis is co-creator of the Ecological Footprint, has worked on sustainability issues for organizations in Europe, Latin America, North America, Asia and Australia, and has lectured internationally. Mathis previously directed the Centre for Sustainability Studies / Centro de Estudios para la Sustentabilidad in Mexico. He has authored or contributed to over fifty peer-reviewed papers, numerous articles and reports.  His recent books include Our Ecological Footprint: Reducing Human Impact on the Earth, Sharing Nature’s Interest, and WWF International’s Living Planet Report.

Global Footprint Network: www.footprintnetwork.org


Your Ecological Footprint

March 21, 2008

Global Footprint Network: Your Ecological Footprint

EcoFootprint

We featured Mathis Wackernagel recently, and talked a little about his project, the Global Footprint Network. The Global Footprint calculates a countries Ecological Footprint, similarly to a way that a country might tout its GDP, and the statistic is becoming more and more accepted worldwide. This nifty quiz based on that concept will tell you you’re personal part of the Ecological Footprint. This is the Australian version, and versions for the US and Canada should appear shortly.

Ever wondered what you’re contribution to ecological impact is? The answer might surprise you, so try it out! Then imagine what your impact would be if you lived in an ecocity, and retake the quiz with that in mind.


Featured Presenter: Mathis Wackernagel

March 10, 2008

Today’s featured presenter is Mathis Wackernagel. In the video below he talks about his project, the Ecological Footprint, based in Oakland California. Look for him during Day Two of the Summit, April 25.

“Ecological wealth is the underlying wealth on which all other wealth depends.” – Mathis Wackernagel

Mathis WackernagelMathis Wackernagel is co-creator of the Ecological Footprint and has worked on sustainability issues for organizations in Europe, Latin America, North America, Asia and Australia, and has lectured for community groups, governments and their agencies, NGOs, and academic audiences at more than 100 universities around the world. Mathis previously served as the director of the Sustainability Program at Redefining Progress in Oakland, CA, and directed the Centre for Sustainability Studies / Centro de Estudios para la Sustentabilidad in Mexico, which he still advises. He is also an adjunct faculty at SAGE of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mathis has authored or contributed to over fifty peer-reviewed papers, numerous articles and reports, and various books on sustainability that focus on the question of embracing limits and developing metrics for sustainability, including Our Ecological Footprint: Reducing Human Impact on the Earth, Sharing Nature’s Interest, and WWF International’s Living Planet Report. After earning a degree in mechanical engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, he completed his Ph.D. in community and regional planning at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. There, as his doctoral dissertation with Professor William Rees, he created the Ecological Footprint concept.


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