Stephen Schneider, Stanford University Climatologist

Stephen H. Schneider, Climatologist, Stanford University

Stephen Schneider is the Stanford University Melvin and Joan Lane professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, co-director at Stanford’s Center for Environmental Science and Policy, and professor by courtesy in the Department of Civil Engineering. Schneider’s current global change research interests include food/climate and other environmental/science public policy issues; ecological and economic implications of climatic change; integrated assessment of global change; climatic modeling of paleoclimates and of human impacts on climate, e.g., carbon dioxide “greenhouse effect” and environmental consequences of nuclear war. In 1998, he became a foreign member of the Academia Europaea, Earth and Cosmic Sciences Section. He was elected Chair of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences Section on Atmospheric and Hydrospheric Sciences (1999-2001). He was a member of the scientific staff of National Center for Atmospheric Research from 1973-1996, where he co-founded the Climate Project.

Stephen H. Schneider: www.stephenschneider.stanford.edu

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One Response to Stephen Schneider, Stanford University Climatologist

  1. [...] four-day heat wave that notes “90 records have been tied or broken” across the East, eminent climatologist Dr. Stephen Schneider explains: While this heat wave like all other heat waves is made by Mother [...]

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